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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this may be a very dumb question but I’m asking it anyway. Is there any way to test your wastegate to see if it has seized up? I have tried pushing it by hand to get the valve to open, but it will not move for the life of me, heck I'm starting to think that the valve Isn't suppose to move at all. I don’t know much about wastegates or any kind of troubleshooting for turbo systems so I was hoping I could get some help from here.

I have a HKS 40mm external wastegate that is in kind of bad shape and I would really rather not have to replace it.

Pics.

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii167/papapinky/IMGP0332.jpg

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii167/papapinky/IMGP0331.jpg
 

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#girlslikeus
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have you tried to remove the spring? without the spring, the valve should move.

depends on the spring, you should be able to move the valve by hand.
 

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pen15
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hook some compressed air up to the nipple on the wastegate.

wastegates are pretty hard to push in by hand. i had a tial 38mm with a pretty soft spring (7.5psi) on my TII and i could barely push it in with my hands.

just hook up some compressed air to the nipple and see if it opens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hooked it up to the compressor and ran 15psi of pressure through it and still no movement, then i tried 50psi and had the same results. I guess I have to tear it down to check the spring. any last suggestions before i do that?
 

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Dude you probably have a blown diagprham in there, esp if 50 psi has no effect. Next time take a simple bicycle tire pump and a boostvac gauge, and you will have less chance of future failures esp since you where testing with an air compressor.
 

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The Rotary Masochist
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Like Nester said, tear it apart. The four allen head screws come out to expose the spring and diaphragm. The cap will come off under tension so it's helpful to have someone else hold it together while you take the screws out. Once the cap is off and the spring tension released the valve should move easily with no resistance. If there is any then you have an issue. You'll also then be able to see if the diaphragm is split.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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The Rotary Masochist
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Clean the guide well. The valve stem looks OK. Anything you use to lube the valve will burn off. But a small amount of anti-seize won't hurt. Put it back together and as long as the valve no slides freely you're good. If it binds at all bin the gate and get a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
There is next to no resistance at all, so good to go there. Now another hopefully small question on most other wastegates the upper half of the housing there is another nozzle leading out, on mine there isn't one. I'm not sure of that nozzles origional purpose but I'm assumeing that it's not necessary for my setup. I wouldn't mind just knowing what it is actually suppose to be there for if someone could just enlighten me, I would be thankful.
 

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The Rotary Masochist
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In the photo the port that is circled in blue is the pressure port. It's the most important. Supply manifold pressure to it to overcome the spring pressure and lift the valve off it's seat. All wastegates have this port and you'll connect a line straight from the manifold to it.

The port circled in red is for a boost controller. By using a bleed valve you can vary the pressure going to that port and effectively increase the spring pressure and thus the pressure at which the valve opens. If you connect nothing to it you'll simply run off the spring pressure and no more. If there is not a port it's not a big deal.
 

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Welcome to The War Room
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Ah look at you all and your turbo problems. It makes me chuckle inside.
 
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